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Which product to use: Garden Soil vs. Potting Soil

Aug 14

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8/14/2012 7:16 AM  RssIcon

What is the real difference between garden soil VS potting soil? Which one should you use and why? There are many different products on the shelves now and knowing what type of soil to buy is vital for your plant growth. Many beginner gardeners might be overwhelm by the abundance of products, so here is a quick break down of garden soil vs. potting soil.

Garden soil

If you are planning on having a vegetable garden or a flower bed outside, garden soil would be the product to use.  Like our Organic Valley Garden Soil, it has a special mixture for growing plants outdoors. Our soil has organic compost ingredients to help feed the plants longer and fertilize naturally. Also these organic ingredients will work well when mixed with native soil to improve the soil structure for the plants. Usually garden soils are more likely to compact and hold the plant roots together for better growth. Usually garden soil with compost will keep breaking down in the garden, as it will produce richer nutrients.  

Potting soil

Potting soil is best used with container plants because of its unique blend in the soil. It is specially made for promoting plant health in a container and has ingredients that are not available in the garden soil.Our Organic Valley Potting Soil has blend of different type of organic ingredients to help plants retain moisture in container, but also provide nutrients. Potting soils are usually less compact and is more permeable providing more air for much needed container plants. Our potting soil is formulated to help plant retain moisture longer because of the better drainage it will have compared to garden soil.  



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